May Fishing Report

May fishing was again varied, as the weather fluctuated from near-perfect to rainy and squally weather lasting for days. Persistent fishermen were rewarded with some nice catches, as evidenced by the pictures we have posted in the gallery. A list of species caught this month includes:

Spanish Mackerel

Pompano

Sheepshead

Ladyfish

Black Sea Bass

Flounder

Cobia

Butterfish

Spotted Sea Trout

Mangrove Snapper

Blue Runner

Jack Crevalle

Key West Grunt

Black Drum

Whiting

Tarpon

Puffer Fish

Barracuda

Snook

Lots of Snook are hanging around the pier, but are not usually biting until the wee hours. When they do bite, they have been taking large live baits or large shrimp free-lined. Snook season is closed, so it is catch-and-release only. Snook should be put back into the water as soon as possible, and it is recommended that they not be simply torpedoed over the side. Snook should be placed back into the landing net and held in the water until they are strong enough to swim upright on their own. Please take pictures of these highly-managed fish quickly, and try not to drop them head-first on the concrete!!

Snook season will re-open in our waters Sept 1st.

Good Luck Fishing!


April Fishing Report

Fishing on Pier 60 in April was filled with variety. Weather varied from postcard-perfect to extreme winds and high surf. Many days the winds were almost calm and the skies clear. Fishing success was just as varied, with many anglers having good days catching a variety of species. We saw:

Butterfish

Silver Trout

Spotted Sea Trout

Ladyfish

Flounder

Spanish Mackerel

Sheepshead

Pompano

Whiting

Sail Catfish

Black Sea Bass

Sharks

Blue Runner

Cobia

Mangrove Snapper

King Mackerel

Snook season was open thru the end of April. We saw a couple of big Snook fought in the last half of the month. Both large fish overpowered the tackle and got away. The last week of the April brought those big females out in a pre-spawn promenade, as they leisurely swam through the lights at the end of the pier. The last night of open season, a slot-sized fish was caught and released.

Good Luck Fishing!


Spring Fishing Pics


March Fishing Report

Fishing on Pier 60 in March was very good, with a big variety of species caught. Fishing success varied because of weather systems pushing thru every ten days or so. We had many “postcard” days, along with plenty of clear but windy days as the fronts approached. Strong squalls and high surf hurt fishing for a few days afterwards. Overall we saw steadily rising temperatures with water temps staying just below 70.

Spanish Mackerel

Silver Trout

Black Sea Bass

Flounder

Permit

Spotted Sea Trout

Mangrove Snapper

White Grunt

Butterfish, or Silver Perch

LadyFish

StingRays

BonnetHead Shark

BlackTip Shark

Snook season is still open, but the water was just too cool to expect to see any.

Good Luck Fishing!


February Fishing Report

February brought both cold fronts with winds and high seas, and postcard days in between. Water temperatures varied from the high 50′s to the low 70′s. What this translates to is good fishing on some days, less-good to poor on other days. Even with waters chilly and in the low 60′s we saw quite a few Spanish Mackerel come over the rails this month, with some fish in excess of 20″. The Mackerel were partial to live shrimp, flashy shiny lures, and cut baits free-lined in the current. On many days we were able to keep catching the Spanish Mackerel even after dark, as they are kept around the pier because of our bright fishing lights.

Butterfish, or Silver Perch were taken in abundance on most days and evenings. Schools of these tasty small fish hold off the ends of the pier, and bite small offerings with gusto. Some anglers use a dual hook rig, and others go with a larger Sabiki rig tipped with bits of squid or shrimp. These fish can be filleted, or scaled and cooked whole.

Silver Trout have been a regular catch, with many anglers taking a dozen or more. Silver Trout have no size or bag limit, and are large enough to provide a nice little fillet. Silver Trout are taken on the multiple hook rigs as well, and tipping the small flies with a morsel of fresh shrimp is a sure way to get the bite going.

Whiting are a usual wintertime catch here, but this years’ results have been a little disconcerting. We have seen some Whiting, and some nice fish over 17″ at that, but the number of fish caught is leaving some fishermen grumbling.

Plenty of Sheepshead have been feeding around the barnacle-encrusted pilings. Sheepshead like shrimp and small crustaceans, so presenting a natural fresh small bait is a sure way to keep them interested. Down-sizing gear can be a good technique to insure success. Try a small gold hook or tiny circle hook tipped with a slice of fresh shrimp, and a small split shot. Get the Sheepshead going with a few pieces of free bait, then throw your baited hook in afterwards. The Sheepshead bite will be subtle and easy to miss; watching your line will be key to timing your hookset. With a little practice, it becomes second nature. Because the Sheepshead eats crabs, some say it tastes a bit like crabmeat. That’s reason enough to give it a try!

Flounder are a regular winter catch here, and we have seen quite a few so far. Look for more as the waters warm firmly into the 70′s. Flounder will take live shrimp, cut baits and lures with equal gusto. The Flounder is a formidable predator, but when he hits your line, it may feel more like a steady weight instead of a slamming hit. Give him time to turn the bait in his mouth before doing battle, and watch for him to shake his open mouth to throw the hook if you let him languish on the surface while you decide what do do with him.

Spotted Sea Trout have been caught in the mornings, but most of the schools show up after dark. On nights we are open late, (Fridays and Saturdays) the Spotted SeaTrout action heats up after 9 PM. On many nights we will see hundreds, if not thousands, of Spotted Sea Trout milling about under the lights, ambushing small fish that are drawn to the lights. You can use live shrimp, lures, cut baits to get the SeaTrout to bite, but they might be a bit partial to one thing or another, and their keen eyesight makes them shy to some rigs or baits. Try getting rid of all non-essential terminal tackle, and see if it helps. Spotted SeaTrout must be 15″ minimum, and one fish of your bag of four fish may be over 20″. Please be careful to follow fisheries regulations, as the FWC does send officers out here regularly, and fines for violators are steep.

Many varieties of small Sharks were caught this month, with BonnetHead and BlackTip Sharks the most common. We have a no-kill policy on all Sharks here at Pier 60. In addition, we do not allow Shark Fishing, so leave the Shark rigs at home.

March is bringing Spring to Pier 60; it is inevitable, but there will be cold fronts and interruptions. Enjoy the cool while we have it, it will be blazing hot soon enough!

On April 1st Pier 60 will start our summertime hours, which means we will be open 24hours / 7 days a week. Your fishing day will be 6 AM to 6 AM the following day.

Good Luck Fishing!